Flat in converted period property where the founder of Salvation Army lived

A flat on the converted Edwardian Period property – where the founder of the Salvation Army lived – has been sold for £ 700,000.

A blue plaque on the outside of the building next to the front door reveals how William Booth lived in his London home from 1903 until his death on 20 August 1912.

The property has been converted into a flat with a ground floor apartment currently on the market.

A flat on this converted Edwardian Period property – where the founder of the Salvation Army lived – has been sold for £ 700,000 through EweMove estate agents.

A blue plaque on the outside of the building next to the front door reveals how William Booth lived in his London home from 1903 until his death on August 20, 1912.

A blue plaque on the outside of the building next to the front door reveals how William Booth lived in his London home from 1903 until his death on August 20, 1912.

William Booth was an English Methodist preacher who founded the Salvation Army with his wife Catherine and became its ‘General’.

The Christian movement has spread from London to many other parts of the world and is known as the largest distributor of humanitarian aid.

Booth’s former home is in Barnett, north London, and the building is now called The Rookstone.

It has been converted into four flats where one is currently for sale which occupies most of the ground floor.

It boasts a living room with high ceilings and lots of Edwardian features, including a ceiling rose.

The flat has two bedrooms and two bathrooms, with its own private garden terrace.

The terrace leads to a well-conserved communal garden, where the property has plenty of space for residents.

The flat has lots of Edwardian features, including a living room with high ceilings and a rose ceiling.

The flat has lots of Edwardian features, including a living room with high ceilings and a rose ceiling.

The kitchen has a white wall and base unit with a matching workshop and blue tiles

The kitchen has a white wall and base unit with a matching workshop and blue tiles

The flat has two bedrooms and two bathrooms, with its own private garden terrace

The flat has two bedrooms and two bathrooms, with its own private garden terrace

Terrace leads to a well-maintained communal garden behind Period property

Terrace leads to a well-maintained communal garden behind Period property

Booth's former home has been converted into four flats in Barnett, north London and now with a communal garden.

Booth’s former home has been converted into four flats in Barnett, north London and now with a communal garden.

The property has leasehold and 96 years lease left. Lenders generally refuse to lend to leaseholders for less than 70 years.

There is off-street parking for a car and the property is a short walk from Hadley Wood Railway Station, with regular train service to Welwyn Garden City and London Murgate.

At the same time, both Cookfoster and High Burnett underground stations are about a mile and a half away.

The property is also in a good location for schools, with Hadley Wood Primary School just 0.1 miles away and St. John’s Preparatory and Senior School just one mile away.

According to property website Zoopla, the average value of property sold in Barnett last year was £ 708,730. That compares with less than half the national average at £ 329,407.

Helen Whitley of OnTheMarket says: ‘The Salvation Army founder, William Booth, once called this house a great opportunity to own this fantastic part of history. Set in the coveted area of ​​Hadley Wood, and with easy access to central London via train and tube links a short distance away, the property combines all that is needed to meet the demands of a busy modern life with a strong sense of tradition. ‘

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